TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [How I Invented a New Internet] On the Fourth of July 1989,
the US Independence Day, I—Philip Emeagwali—
experimentally discovered how to build a new supercomputer
that is a new internet that encircled the globe
in the way our planetary-sized internet
does. I experimentally discovered
how to build that new internet and do so from an ensemble of
commodity-off-the-shelf processors that were identical
and that were equal distances apart.
That new knowledge was knowing my new internet
as a global network of 1,048,576 email wires
that I visualized as tightly circumscribing
the hypersurface of a hyperglobe in a sixteen-dimensional hyperspace.
My experimental discovery of massively parallel processing
that occurred around that new internet and that occurred
on the Fourth of July 1989 made the news headlines
and was reported in the June 20, 1990 issue of The Wall Street Journal.
Eleven years later, that experimental discovery
of a new internet that is also a new supercomputer
was reconfirmed by then President Bill Clinton
and reconfirmed in his presidential lecture
of August 26, 2000. That presidential lecture was delivered
to the Nigerian parliament in Abuja, Nigeria. [Philip Emeagwali’s Discoveries] For me, and by the late 1980s,
Amdahl’s Law —that, de facto, said that
parallel processing will forever remain a huge waste of everybody’s
time— was like a mist in the sun.
On the Fourth of July 1989, the US Independence Day,
I experimentally discovered how an ensemble of
65,536 commodity processors could be harnessed
as the building blocks of a new supercomputer
to become the fastest supercomputer in the world.
I discovered how to build a new supercomputer
that encircled the globe in the way
the internet does and build it
from an ensemble of commodity-off-the-shelf processors
that were identical and that were equal distances apart.
I experimentally discovered how to use that new supercomputer
to accurately solve excruciatingly-detailed
computational fluid dynamics models. I experimentally discovered
how to solve the toughest problems in algebra, calculus,
and physics that were named
the twenty grand challenge problems of supercomputing.
I experimentally discovered how to execute computation-intensive codes
and do so in parallel, or by solving 65,536 initial-boundary value problems
at once, instead of solving
only one initial-boundary value problem at a time.
I experimentally discovered how to solve, in parallel, a system of coupled,
non-linear, time-dependent, and state-of-the-art partial differential equations
of modern mathematics, called Emeagwali’s Equations,
that I invented that encoded a set of laws of physics
that governed the flow of fluids that enshrouded the Earth,
as the crude oil, injected water, and natural gas
underneath the surface of the Earth or the rivers, lakes, and oceans
on the surface of the Earth or the air and moisture
above the surface of the Earth. The partial differential equations
of calculus is the mathematical technique
we use to measure and understand how things move in our universe.
The universal laws of motion of physics that were encoded
into those partial differential equations explain how things move
in our universe. Extreme-scale computational physicists
use those laws of motion to deepen our knowledge
of the Earth’s past, present, and future as well as to have a surer understanding
of how our universe was formed
13.8 billion years ago. The Philip Emeagwali’s
system of nine partial differential equations of modern mathematics
describe how crude oil, injected water, and natural gas
move underneath the surface of the Earth. I also experimentally discovered
how to measure the previously unmeasurable speed.
That quest is a mathematical journey from fiction to fact to forecast. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture